Thursday, July 8, 2021
HomeHealthcareGV leads $72M investment in startup offering virtual behavioral healthcare for kids

GV leads $72M investment in startup offering virtual behavioral healthcare for kids

Before the pandemic, there was already a scarcity of pediatric behavioral health service providers. Parents surveyed last year stated their kid’s mental health had actually aggravated, and at the exact same time, the variety of children covered by Medicaid getting mental health services reduced dramatically. Brightline, a digital health start-up focused on providing virtual behavioral health services for kids and their families just recently raised$72 million in funding. GV led the funding round, with Optum Ventures, 7wireVentures, and Gaingels, an investment syndicate for LGBTQ+people and

allies, signing up with as new financiers. The financing round also consisted of$7 million in endeavor debt from Silicon Valley Bank. Brightline plans to utilize the new funds as part of a more comprehensive push for its services to be covered by insurance companies. The Palo Alto-based business was co-founded two years ago by Naomi Allen, a digital health entrepreneur who has acted as an executive at Livongo and Castlight Health. When he had stress and anxiety, she started the business based on her own experiences finding care for her child. “When we got(my boy )in to care, no one told me in the minute how to assist him when he was having a stress and anxiety attack,”Allen said. “For every step of a care journey that a child has, we’re engaging parents and caretakers with training.”Brightline connects children, teenagers and their families to virtual visits with behavioral therapists, speech therapists and coaches. A key part of the design is not just linking youth with scientific services, but likewise providing caregivers and moms and dads guidance for how to best support them. The company presently charges a cash cost for each check out, but Allen said the objective from the beginning was

for Brightline’s services to be covered, and that it is presently in discussions with insurance companies and health insurance. Brightline presently operates in California and Massachusetts, and is broadening to Washington state next month. Allen prepares for the startup to be in all 50 states by the end of the year. Its clinicians currently use

care for kids from 1.5 years to 18 years old. The method differs significantly depending on each kid’s age and their requirements. Between ages one and two, delays in speech or difficulties with social interaction may end up being

more visible, and parents or caregivers work side-by-side with their kids. Around age 6, kids can speak to a clinician individually, however family is still very included. At older ages, therapy check outs are private, but caregivers still get suggestions on how to support their child. More recently, Brightline also added coaching for households that may not be ready to begin treatment, however still have issues they wish to attend to. Numerous families said their kids were anxious during the serious wildfires in Northern California last year. Households also looked for assistance on methods to discuss pronouns or have helpful discussions with youth who were coming out. During the height of the pandemic, numerous households required support for stress and anxiety or help establishing regimens, Allen stated. Now, as people begin to ease back into their old

regimens, they’re dealing with new challenges.”Now, we see a brand-new crop of things coming up: gender dysphoria, body image concerns, stress and anxiety around going back to school, a sense of grief and loss around high schoolers that have lost a big chunk of their high school experience,”she stated. “What we’re going to experience this fall is an essential shift in terms of what households are going to need to deal with once again.

“Picture credit: Evgeny Gromov, Getty Images

Brightline, a digital health start-up focused on using virtual behavioral health services for kids and their households recently raised$72 million in funding. The Palo Alto-based business was co-founded 2 years back by Naomi Allen, a digital health business owner who has actually served as an executive at Livongo and Castlight Health. Brightline connects kids, teens and their households to virtual visits with behavioral therapists, speech therapists and coaches. Lots of households stated their kids were distressed during the serious wildfires in Northern California last year. During the height of the pandemic, many households required assistance for anxiety or aid establishing regimens, Allen stated.

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