Thursday, July 8, 2021
HomeHealthcareProviders win deadline extension for use of CARES funds, but it may...

Providers win deadline extension for use of CARES funds, but it may cause some confusion

The supplier relief funds, dispersed under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, were a lifeline for health centers and other companies during a pandemic that decimated their financial health, he stated in a phone interview. Now, providers who received funds in the latter half of 2020– between July 1 and Dec. 31– have up until the end of this year to utilize the funds and till March 2022 to complete the reporting requirements. The initial deadlines stand for suppliers who got their funds in between April 10 and June 30, 2020. Not only that, but the upgraded reporting timeline also allows providers to stay focused on responding to the pandemic, including the existing vaccine rollouts, stated Peter Urbanowicz, handling director and co-head of Alvarez & Marsal’s Healthcare Industry Group, in an e-mail. One is that not all providers will be able to take advantage of the extension as those who received funds in the very first half of the year still have to utilize them up by June 30.

After receiving push back from companies, the Department of Health and Human Services has consented to extend a few of the deadlines enforced on spending and reporting using relief funds medical facilities gotten throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. This is a largely positive move, there are some cons, consisting of the fact that the extension does not use to all service providers. That’s according to Michael P. Strazzella, head of federal government relations at law firm Buchanan, Ingersoll and Rooney.

The supplier relief funds, dispersed under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, were a lifeline for healthcare facilities and other suppliers during a pandemic that annihilated their financial health, he said in a phone interview. Initially, HHS had stated that hospitals have to expend the funds they received by June 30 of this year and submit a report detailing that usage by July 31. Now, providers who received funds in the latter half of 2020– between July 1 and Dec. 31– have till the end of this year to use the funds and up until March 2022 to finish the reporting requirements. The initial due dates stand for service providers who got their funds between April 10 and June 30, 2020. A number of market groups, consisting of the American Hospital Association, were advising HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra to extend those deadlines. Following the announcement, they made their approval understood. And health care experts carefully following the developments concur that this is a win for companies.”The prolonged due dates for usage and reporting give suppliers extra time to expend the [service provider relief funds] that may have been gotten in later ‘tranches’or rollouts … and keeps with the initial spirit and intent of the June 30, 2021, due date,”stated Morgan Lewis healthcare partner Gregory Etzel, in an e-mail.”It effectively verifies that suppliers have in between 12 and 18 months to expend the [money] they get, depending upon the date they receive the funds. “Further, the reporting window has been extended from one month to 3, which will assist providers guarantee they are appropriately recording the costs, Etzel said. Not just that, however the updated reporting timeline likewise permits companies to stay focused on reacting to the pandemic, consisting of the existing vaccine rollouts, said Peter Urbanowicz, managing director and co-head of Alvarez & Marsal’s Healthcare Industry Group, in an e-mail. “As the Covid-19 vaccine rollouts continue, one would expect there to be less and less of a need for governmental assistance, but as long as companies are still having to ‘avoid, prepare, and react to Covid-19 ‘they should have the chance to justify the use and use up of [the provider relief fund] dollars received,”he stated. However the due date extension is not without its disadvantages.

One is that not all companies will have the ability to benefit from the extension as those who received funds in the very first half of the year still have to utilize them up by June 30. “That’s most likely the one place I would have liked to have actually seen that deadline moved back by a couple of months, “Buchanan, Ingersoll and Rooney’s Strazzella stated. In addition, since there are two different due dates for costs and reporting on funds received last year, it might develop extra

work as organizations will have to go back and divided documents on expenditures and lost income based upon the dates the payments were received, Urbanowicz stated.

This may eventually cause confusion, making”cautious documentation of the ‘life cycle’of such funds … essential to prompt and appropriate reporting,”Etzel stated.

Image: simarik, Getty Images

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